Discovering indian classical singing, where to start?

This board is just for newbies to place their questions, and for the old timers to answer their questions with patience. Remember, THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A STUPID QUESTION!

Moderators: povster, s1owpoke, cabernethy, coughcapkittykat

gibreel
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Jun 22, 2012 10:20 pm

Discovering indian classical singing, where to start?

Postby gibreel » Sat Jun 23, 2012 2:53 pm

Dear friends
I had a very strong experience with carnatic classical vocal music, while I was staying in Chennai for the annual carnatic classical music and dance-season. I have tried to reestablish contact with this deep and beautfiul world, but venturing into the indian classical music scene, just seems bewildering. You have such a large body of material based on completely different rhythmic and melodic concepts than the music you are used to, a vast jungle of different performers with, for the western eye, impossible names composed by uncountable syllables, that I will never be able to remember anyway. I just found that getting to know Indian classical music has proved to be a hard task for me, though I'm convinced of how incredible and precious this unique style of music is. I just realized that I could really use some expert help here, which could give me a starting point on this long journey. I would love some suggestions for a few of the greatest hindustani and carnatic classical vocalists, and maybe some recommended cd's. I'm not looking for something which is especially accesible to the western ear here, that doesn't interest me. I'm looking for cd's that will, if I listen to them with great attention and patience will open up the full depth of indian classical singing, in all of it's strength and colours.
Thank you

Ps. If you have unique suggestions for outstanding instrumentalists and regarding the works of Ravi Shankar, which I'm enjoying at the moment, these would be much appreciated as well.

OM GUY
Posts: 872
Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2010 4:10 am
Location: Bothell, Washington State USA

Re: Discovering indian classical singing, where to start?

Postby OM GUY » Sat Jun 23, 2012 8:30 pm

Hi~

You seem to be hopping from singing to intrumental music, so I will try to generalize both, in terms of steering you in those directions.

First, there are more categories on this forum that you can jump into and bathe yourself in those different discussions, they are a treasure trove of golden nuggets, as well as the grey boxes with the blue letters to your left. Read and read and read some more, I'm sure if you PM a few of the people who post here, they will help you, as well.

You tube is also a treasure trove, as is amazon, so that you can listen to some clips that may be of interest.

I don't know where you are located, but see if there is a Hundu Temple near you, walk in, and ask around, there's bound to be someone who sings or plays who might be of help.

Good luck, I hope you find what you are looking for, you couldn't find a better place to start than Chandy's place! :P
Let's hope 2016 is less violent and that people discover the soothing influence of ICM. Hari OM!

Bhuvanesh
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Dec 27, 2010 8:10 pm

Re: Discovering indian classical singing, where to start?

Postby Bhuvanesh » Sat Jun 30, 2012 7:48 pm

I don't have CD information (in some cases I have LPs), but here's a list of my favorite vocal performances in case it is useful. Caveat: I tend to prefer longer recordings that include a significant slow-tempo (vilambit) portion, which is why there's no Abdul Karim Khan or Kumar Gandharva here.

Amir Khan - all of his recordings, but especially Darbari, Marwa, Malkauns, Hansadhwani, Abhogi, Miya Malhar, Megh, Lalit, Ramkali, Bhatiyar, Todi, Bilaskhani Todi, Ahir Bhairav, Nat Bhairav, Bihag, Shree, Bageshree, Bageshree Kanada, Rageshree, Puriya, Shuddh Kalyan, Yaman and Yaman Kalyan
Bade Ghulam Ali Khan - Bhoop, Gunkali, Hameer, Jaijaiwanti, Kamod
Bhimsen Joshi - Brindabani Sarang, Durga, Komal Rishabh Asavari, Lalit, Malkauns, Miya Malhar, Multani, Puriya, Puriya Dhanashree, Todi, Yaman Kalyan
Dagar Brothers (senior) - Darbari, Kambhoji, Komal Rishabh Asavari, Todi
D. V. Paluskar - Bageshree Kanada, Bhoop, Desi, Kamod, Ramkali, Shree
Faiyyaz Khan - Bhimpalasi, Desi, Maru Bihag, Tilak Kamod
Gangubai Hangal - Komal Rishabh Asavari, Miya Malhar
Gundecha Brothers - Bhairav
Hirabai Barodekar - Multani
Jasraj - Bilaskhani Todi, Gorakh Kalyan
Kesarbai Kerkar - Bhimpalasi, Durga, Lalita Gauri, Malkauns, Nand, Shuddh Kalyan
Kishori Amonkar - Bageshree, Bhinna Shadja, Bhoop, Gujari Todi, Jaunpuri, Miya Malhar
Laxmi Shankar - Kirwani
Mallikarjun Mansur - Bahaduri Todi, Bhairav, Bihagda, Deshkar, Gaud Malhar, Jaunpuri
Nazakat-Salamat Ali Khan - Darbari, Kalavati
Nissar Hussein Khan - Chhaya Nat, Gaud Malhar
Prabha Atre - Kalavati, Maru Bihag
Roshanara Begum - Basant, Shankara
Sharafat Hussein Khan - Bageshree Bahar, Nand, Todi

As far as instrumental goes I listen to Ali Akbar Khan, Nikhil Banerjee, Vilayat Khan, Asad Ali Khan and Zia Mohiuddin Dagar, as well as a few recordings from Imrat Khan, Jaya Biswas, Radhika Mohan Maitra, Pannalal Ghosh, Bismillah Khan, Abdul Lateef Khan, Amjad Ali Khan and Ravi Shankar. I haven't really been attracted to Ravi Shankar much, but some of his recordings are pretty decent -- Hameer, Kirwani, Madhuvanti and Nand come to mind.

pbercker
Posts: 1468
Joined: Mon May 28, 2012 7:53 am
Location: st peters missouri

Re: Discovering indian classical singing, where to start?

Postby pbercker » Sun Jul 08, 2012 7:39 pm

gibreel wrote:Dear friends
I had a very strong experience with carnatic classical vocal music, while I was staying in Chennai for the annual carnatic classical music and dance-season. I have tried to reestablish contact with this deep and beautfiul world, but venturing into the indian classical music scene, just seems bewildering. You have such a large body of material based on completely different rhythmic and melodic concepts than the music you are used to, a vast jungle of different performers with, for the western eye, impossible names composed by uncountable syllables, that I will never be able to remember anyway. I just found that getting to know Indian classical music has proved to be a hard task for me, though I'm convinced of how incredible and precious this unique style of music is. I just realized that I could really use some expert help here, which could give me a starting point on this long journey. I would love some suggestions for a few of the greatest hindustani and carnatic classical vocalists, and maybe some recommended cd's. I'm not looking for something which is especially accesible to the western ear here, that doesn't interest me. I'm looking for cd's that will, if I listen to them with great attention and patience will open up the full depth of indian classical singing, in all of it's strength and colours.
Thank you

Ps. If you have unique suggestions for outstanding instrumentalists and regarding the works of Ravi Shankar, which I'm enjoying at the moment, these would be much appreciated as well.


I would try some of the following as they are - to my ears - instantly pleasing:

Kishori Amonkar - rag Bhoop and rag rageshri
Miling Chittal - rag Kalavati
Salamat Ali Khan - rag Kalavati - Rag Abhogi
My opinion given without any warranties, expressed or implied, that it's even relevant. It would be folly to rely on my opinion without seeking more professional tabla advice. If you are suffering from a tabla condition, seek immediate attention.

User avatar
nicneufeld
Posts: 1590
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2011 7:59 pm
Location: Kansas City, Missouri

Re: Discovering indian classical singing, where to start?

Postby nicneufeld » Mon Jul 09, 2012 3:05 am

pbercker wrote:to my ears - instantly pleasing: Kishori Amonkar - rag Bhoop


To my ears as well. "sahela re", one of the unusually immediately appealing bits of Hindustani vocal.

pbercker
Posts: 1468
Joined: Mon May 28, 2012 7:53 am
Location: st peters missouri

Re: Discovering indian classical singing, where to start?

Postby pbercker » Mon Jul 09, 2012 11:05 am

gibreel wrote:Dear friends
I had a very strong experience with carnatic classical vocal music, while I was staying in Chennai for the annual carnatic classical music and dance-season. I have tried to reestablish contact with this deep and beautfiul world, but venturing into the indian classical music scene, just seems bewildering. You have such a large body of material based on completely different rhythmic and melodic concepts than the music you are used to, a vast jungle of different performers with, for the western eye, impossible names composed by uncountable syllables, that I will never be able to remember anyway. I just found that getting to know Indian classical music has proved to be a hard task for me, though I'm convinced of how incredible and precious this unique style of music is. I just realized that I could really use some expert help here, which could give me a starting point on this long journey. I would love some suggestions for a few of the greatest hindustani and carnatic classical vocalists, and maybe some recommended cd's. I'm not looking for something which is especially accesible to the western ear here, that doesn't interest me. I'm looking for cd's that will, if I listen to them with great attention and patience will open up the full depth of indian classical singing, in all of it's strength and colours.
Thank you

Ps. If you have unique suggestions for outstanding instrumentalists and regarding the works of Ravi Shankar, which I'm enjoying at the moment, these would be much appreciated as well.


You might also check out utube ... specifically the Lahore Music Forum (LMF) which has put out several dozen high quality video/audio of yearly classical concerts that promote the Pakistani side of classical hindustani music. It's a great mix of instrumental and vocal talent, a few from the older generation, but mostly featuring the younger generation of musician. Well worth a look and a listen ... and it's free!

Two of my favorites are Akbar Ali (vocalist) who sings a bagesrhi - a very accesible raga, and Shujat Ali Khan (vocalist, grandson of the great Salamat Ali Khan) who sings Mad Kalyan, and Shafqat Ali Khan (son of Salamat Ali Khan) who sings Rageshre I think.

Pascal Bercker
My opinion given without any warranties, expressed or implied, that it's even relevant. It would be folly to rely on my opinion without seeking more professional tabla advice. If you are suffering from a tabla condition, seek immediate attention.

pbercker
Posts: 1468
Joined: Mon May 28, 2012 7:53 am
Location: st peters missouri

Re: Discovering indian classical singing, where to start?

Postby pbercker » Mon Jul 09, 2012 11:13 am

Bhuvanesh wrote:I don't have CD information (in some cases I have LPs), but here's a list of my favorite vocal performances in case it is useful. Caveat: I tend to prefer longer recordings that include a significant slow-tempo (vilambit) portion, which is why there's no Abdul Karim Khan or Kumar Gandharva here.

Amir Khan - all of his recordings, but especially Darbari, Marwa, Malkauns, Hansadhwani, Abhogi, Miya Malhar, Megh, Lalit, Ramkali, Bhatiyar, Todi, Bilaskhani Todi, Ahir Bhairav, Nat Bhairav, Bihag, Shree, Bageshree, Bageshree Kanada, Rageshree, Puriya, Shuddh Kalyan, Yaman and Yaman Kalyan
Bade Ghulam Ali Khan - Bhoop, Gunkali, Hameer, Jaijaiwanti, Kamod
Bhimsen Joshi - Brindabani Sarang, Durga, Komal Rishabh Asavari, Lalit, Malkauns, Miya Malhar, Multani, Puriya, Puriya Dhanashree, Todi, Yaman Kalyan
Dagar Brothers (senior) - Darbari, Kambhoji, Komal Rishabh Asavari, Todi
D. V. Paluskar - Bageshree Kanada, Bhoop, Desi, Kamod, Ramkali, Shree
Faiyyaz Khan - Bhimpalasi, Desi, Maru Bihag, Tilak Kamod
Gangubai Hangal - Komal Rishabh Asavari, Miya Malhar
Gundecha Brothers - Bhairav
Hirabai Barodekar - Multani
Jasraj - Bilaskhani Todi, Gorakh Kalyan
Kesarbai Kerkar - Bhimpalasi, Durga, Lalita Gauri, Malkauns, Nand, Shuddh Kalyan
Kishori Amonkar - Bageshree, Bhinna Shadja, Bhoop, Gujari Todi, Jaunpuri, Miya Malhar
Laxmi Shankar - Kirwani
Mallikarjun Mansur - Bahaduri Todi, Bhairav, Bihagda, Deshkar, Gaud Malhar, Jaunpuri
Nazakat-Salamat Ali Khan - Darbari, Kalavati
Nissar Hussein Khan - Chhaya Nat, Gaud Malhar
Prabha Atre - Kalavati, Maru Bihag
Roshanara Begum - Basant, Shankara
Sharafat Hussein Khan - Bageshree Bahar, Nand, Todi

As far as instrumental goes I listen to Ali Akbar Khan, Nikhil Banerjee, Vilayat Khan, Asad Ali Khan and Zia Mohiuddin Dagar, as well as a few recordings from Imrat Khan, Jaya Biswas, Radhika Mohan Maitra, Pannalal Ghosh, Bismillah Khan, Abdul Lateef Khan, Amjad Ali Khan and Ravi Shankar. I haven't really been attracted to Ravi Shankar much, but some of his recordings are pretty decent -- Hameer, Kirwani, Madhuvanti and Nand come to mind.


That's a very impressive and wide ranging list of vocalist you have here. In view of its depth and breadth, I'm surprised I don't see the name Ustad Rashid Khan who is certainly one of my favorite vocalist.

For the instrumental side, be sure to consider the Santoor, as played by, of course Shiv Kumar Sharma, but also Satish Vyas (rag Jog) and Bajan Sopori.

Pascal Bercker
My opinion given without any warranties, expressed or implied, that it's even relevant. It would be folly to rely on my opinion without seeking more professional tabla advice. If you are suffering from a tabla condition, seek immediate attention.

Bhuvanesh
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Dec 27, 2010 8:10 pm

Re: Discovering indian classical singing, where to start?

Postby Bhuvanesh » Mon Jul 09, 2012 8:54 pm

pbercker wrote:That's a very impressive and wide ranging list of vocalist you have here. In view of its depth and breadth, I'm surprised I don't see the name Ustad Rashid Khan who is certainly one of my favorite vocalist.


Indeed. I also missed Ulhas Kashalkar.

pbercker wrote:For the instrumental side, be sure to consider the Santoor, as played by, of course Shiv Kumar Sharma, but also Satish Vyas (rag Jog) and Bajan Sopori.

Pascal Bercker


"Call of the Valley" was decent, but in general I personally am not really into the santoor as a classical instrument.

pbercker
Posts: 1468
Joined: Mon May 28, 2012 7:53 am
Location: st peters missouri

Re: Discovering indian classical singing, where to start?

Postby pbercker » Tue Jul 10, 2012 4:15 am

Bhuvanesh wrote:
pbercker wrote:That's a very impressive and wide ranging list of vocalist you have here. In view of its depth and breadth, I'm surprised I don't see the name Ustad Rashid Khan who is certainly one of my favorite vocalist.


Indeed. I also missed Ulhas Kashalkar.


I'm not familiar with him but that reminds that I very much like Uday Bhawalkar as well, the dhrupad singer. The female vocalist Parween Sultana should not be overlooked as well, not to be confused with the great ghazal singer Abida Parween (see her singing Bulleh Shah on youtube).

pbercker wrote:For the instrumental side, be sure to consider the Santoor, as played by, of course Shiv Kumar Sharma, but also Satish Vyas (rag Jog) and Bajan Sopori.

Pascal Bercker

bhuvanes wrote: "Call of the Valley" was decent, but in general I personally am not really into the santoor as a classical instrument.


It took me a bit getting used to the santoor as a classical instrument especially coming from the point of view of the sitar as my very first and lasting love affair with Classical Indian music, and at first thought that those glides across the strings was a very poor substitute for meends and gammaks on the sitar - in fact I thought it was a bit gimmicky (a terrible pun lurks in there!) but I'm over that, and the santoor taken on its own is a lovely instrument to my ears now. Two recordings that I especially favor are CASCADE with Satish Vyas playing rag Jog, and Tarun Batthacharya on santoor playing rag Gujari Todi.

For me the instrument that I simply cannot fully get into is the Sarod, in spite of having tried to listen to the greats like Alik Akbar khan, Pandit Buddhadev Das Gupta, Ustad Amjad Ali Khan, among others. I've seen all 3 in live concerts and while I very much appreciated their performances, and can indeed say that I liked it, I cannot say that I love the sarod in the same way that I truly deeply love the sitar especially in the hands of the late Ustad Vilayat Khan. For me the very best current sitarists in that mold of playing are Shahid Parvez and Budhaditya Mukherjee, but not to be overlooked are also Irshad Khan, Nishat Khan, and Shujaat Khan.


Pascal Bercker
My opinion given without any warranties, expressed or implied, that it's even relevant. It would be folly to rely on my opinion without seeking more professional tabla advice. If you are suffering from a tabla condition, seek immediate attention.

Bhuvanesh
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Dec 27, 2010 8:10 pm

Re: Discovering indian classical singing, where to start?

Postby Bhuvanesh » Wed Jul 11, 2012 4:16 am

pbercker wrote:I'm not familiar with him but that reminds that I very much like Uday Bhawalkar as well, the dhrupad singer. The female vocalist Parween Sultana should not be overlooked as well, not to be confused with the great ghazal singer Abida Parween (see her singing Bulleh Shah on youtube).


Uday Bhawalkar is okay, but I just haven't found his singing to be interesting enough to put him on my list of favorites. As a kid I used to love Parween Sultana, but she is no longer on my list of favorites. She has some nice pieces such as Nandkauns and Rajani Kalyan, but her habit of screeching eventually got to me (she makes it a point to go to the edge of her vocal range regardless of what she's singing).

pbercker wrote:For me the instrument that I simply cannot fully get into is the Sarod, in spite of having tried to listen to the greats like Alik Akbar khan, Pandit Buddhadev Das Gupta, Ustad Amjad Ali Khan, among others. I've seen all 3 in live concerts and while I very much appreciated their performances, and can indeed say that I liked it, I cannot say that I love the sarod in the same way that I truly deeply love the sitar especially in the hands of the late Ustad Vilayat Khan.


What is it about the sarod? Is it the sound, the technique, or something else?

pbercker
Posts: 1468
Joined: Mon May 28, 2012 7:53 am
Location: st peters missouri

Re: Discovering indian classical singing, where to start?

Postby pbercker » Fri Jul 13, 2012 11:12 am

Bhuvanesh wrote:
pbercker wrote:I'm not familiar with him but that reminds that I very much like Uday Bhawalkar as well, the dhrupad singer. The female vocalist Parween Sultana should not be overlooked as well, not to be confused with the great ghazal singer Abida Parween (see her singing Bulleh Shah on youtube).


Uday Bhawalkar is okay, but I just haven't found his singing to be interesting enough to put him on my list of favorites. As a kid I used to love Parween Sultana, but she is no longer on my list of favorites. She has some nice pieces such as Nandkauns and Rajani Kalyan, but her habit of screeching eventually got to me (she makes it a point to go to the edge of her vocal range regardless of what she's singing).

pbercker wrote:For me the instrument that I simply cannot fully get into is the Sarod, in spite of having tried to listen to the greats like Alik Akbar khan, Pandit Buddhadev Das Gupta, Ustad Amjad Ali Khan, among others. I've seen all 3 in live concerts and while I very much appreciated their performances, and can indeed say that I liked it, I cannot say that I love the sarod in the same way that I truly deeply love the sitar especially in the hands of the late Ustad Vilayat Khan.


What is it about the sarod? Is it the sound, the technique, or something else?


One of my books on sitar written by Ram Avtar Vir talks about the sitar being popular because of "its sweet clink and melodious sound" .... "clink" is perhaps not the word I would have chosen, but in truth, for me the sarod lacks that "sweet clink" I love so much in the sitar ... just the sound of a well tuned tamboura alone pricks up my ears immediately .... it's that quality of sound that the sitar has that the sarod lacks for me.

Pascal
My opinion given without any warranties, expressed or implied, that it's even relevant. It would be folly to rely on my opinion without seeking more professional tabla advice. If you are suffering from a tabla condition, seek immediate attention.


Return to “ICM NEWBIES”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests