The meaning of "chandrakantha"

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mistergreen
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The meaning of "chandrakantha"

Post by mistergreen » Mon Jul 22, 2013 6:13 pm

I am currently learning to read and write Sanskrit a little bit,

What does the name of this forum "chandrakantha" mean?

And is it Sanskrit, or a modern Indian word?

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nicneufeld
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Re: The meaning of "chandrakantha"

Post by nicneufeld » Mon Jul 22, 2013 7:01 pm

I'm only inferring but it appears to be the name of one of our gracious hosts! See the image in the upper left.

Charles
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Re: The meaning of "chandrakantha"

Post by Charles » Tue Jul 23, 2013 6:28 am

It would seem to be from Sanskrit, meaning "beloved of the moon"

http://www.behindthename.com/name/chandrakant

There is no "th" sound (like "theme" in English) in Sanskrit or Hindi, so given the usual transliteration conventions I would guess that Chandrakantha is a variant, pronounced Chandrakanta, with a short puff of air after the 't'.

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mistergreen
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Re: The meaning of "chandrakantha"

Post by mistergreen » Wed Jul 24, 2013 10:44 pm

Charles wrote:It would seem to be from Sanskrit, meaning "beloved of the moon"

http://www.behindthename.com/name/chandrakant

There is no "th" sound (like "theme" in English) in Sanskrit or Hindi, so given the usual transliteration conventions I would guess that Chandrakantha is a variant, pronounced Chandrakanta, with a short puff of air after the 't'.
Beautiful!
I've just learned all of the syllables, its been harding reading "th" and having to automatically throw away the English "th" thought.

The short puff of air I've heard as described as an "aspirated" consonant, but I'm still somewhat unsure of how to execute that properly.

Is this like the word "pirate", where there is almost a sigh after the plosive sound made by the mouth?

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Re: The meaning of "chandrakantha"

Post by david » Thu Jul 25, 2013 1:36 am

The "h" really signifies nothing more than the peculiar South Indian custom of sticking unnecessary H after the dental "t". This is seen in south Indian transliterations such as "Rathna" or "Ashthalaxmi." There is some rational for this as it does separate the dental from the palatal "t". But it just creates more confusion by making it hard to tell the dental "t" from the aspirated dental "t" or the aspirated palatal "t".

Peace

David Courtney

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