Dilruba tuning

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splitfingers
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Dilruba tuning

Postby splitfingers » Sun Aug 12, 2012 4:34 am

I recently purchased a Srishti dilruba which has 6 main strings instead of 4. I have been able to find tuning charts and information for the 4 string, but not the 6 string model. Could someone post the needed tuning information or a link to a website that gives this information.

In addition, has anyone on this forum used the Dilruba Tutor #1 video by Batish? If so, did you find it to be worthwhile?

OM GUY
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Re: Dilruba tuning

Postby OM GUY » Sun Aug 12, 2012 9:23 pm

I too have one of these glorious Srishti's. I simply tune mine up like a sitar. Please read the write up on the dilruba here in David's forum.

I will send you an answer to your last question in a PM.
Let's hope 2016 is less violent and that people discover the soothing influence of ICM. Hari OM!

Jeredhunter1
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Re: Dilruba tuning

Postby Jeredhunter1 » Wed Sep 05, 2012 5:41 pm

I have a dilruba with six strings and I tune the last two to Sa, the same gague and note as my second playing string. My main playing strings are tuned: Sa Sa Sa(low) Pa Sa Ma.

As for the Batish tutor #1 I would also like the pm. I am considering purchasing it myself over Amazon and don't want to waste $50 if I don't have to.

Jered

splitfingers
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Location: Utah

Re: Dilruba tuning

Postby splitfingers » Fri Sep 07, 2012 11:51 pm

Thanks Jered and Ray for your suggestions. I am experimenting with both of your tunings to decide what fits best for me.

OM GUY
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Re: Dilruba tuning

Postby OM GUY » Sat Sep 08, 2012 7:21 am

splitfingers wrote:Thanks Jered and Ray for your suggestions. I am experimenting with both of your tunings to decide what fits best for me.


Be sure and let us know, :wink:
Let's hope 2016 is less violent and that people discover the soothing influence of ICM. Hari OM!

`hege
Posts: 41
Joined: Tue Dec 20, 2011 5:36 am

Re: Dilruba tuning

Postby `hege » Fri Jul 04, 2014 5:45 am

Resurrecting an older thread. Thanks everyone in advance.

My Dilruba also has 6 strings, and not 4

Is there significance to the 2 added strings? Is it a regional development or a particular style of instrument?

All 6 are so close to the same level, it seems a lot of finesse might be required to pick out the second and possibly third strings with the bow. I am thinking that some repositioning of the strings on the bridge could provide more singulation of at least the first 2 strings?
`hege

arvsingh
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Joined: Thu Mar 21, 2013 7:40 pm

Re: Dilruba tuning

Postby arvsingh » Sun Nov 16, 2014 10:43 pm

`hege wrote:Resurrecting an older thread. Thanks everyone in advance.

My Dilruba also has 6 strings, and not 4

Is there significance to the 2 added strings? Is it a regional development or a particular style of instrument?

All 6 are so close to the same level, it seems a lot of finesse might be required to pick out the second and possibly third strings with the bow. I am thinking that some repositioning of the strings on the bridge could provide more singulation of at least the first 2 strings?
`hege


In my opinion, I find it weird to have 6 string, I've played a 6 string dilruba but I find it hard to use the second string, during the rare occasion that I do use it. For the 4 string, it's much easier to use the second string, I think they just believe the Dilruba should only be played on that one string and have the rest for resonances and such. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.
Other than that, check the bridge, when I got my first dilruba from eBay, I had to grind the bridge down and put holes in it cause it was too thick and too flat, so needed to lighten it up and curve it, it's fine now but the next one I bought I made sure the bridge was proper and that the second string was playable.

david
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Re: Dilruba tuning

Postby david » Mon Nov 17, 2014 5:01 pm

The last post is indeed correct. Look at the bridge and it will tell you whether the other strings were ever intended to be played. In most cases the instrument was designed to only be played with one string. Therefore the other strings are just drone strings.

It is possible to take the bridge off and re-work it. I posted a completed discussion on this. However this is a lot of work.

In most cases one merely wishes to facilitate access to the second string. This can be improved without unstringing the instrument. In the case of the 4 string ones, cut groves in both upper and lower bridges to bring the 3rd string very close to the 4th string. 5 mm generally works fine. Then cut another grove exactly midway between the first and 3rd string.

If you are using a 6 stringed instrument you can move 3, 4, and 5 close to the s string. Again a 5mm gap will be sufficient. Move the 2nd string to the midpoint between string 1, and string 3.

In either case we have improved access to the second string without having to do a lot of work.

`hege
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Joined: Tue Dec 20, 2011 5:36 am

Re: Dilruba tuning

Postby `hege » Mon Nov 17, 2014 7:22 pm

david wrote:The last post is indeed correct. Look at the bridge and it will tell you whether the other strings were ever intended to be played. In most cases the instrument was designed to only be played with one string. Therefore the other strings are just drone strings.

It is possible to take the bridge off and re-work it. I posted a completed discussion on this. However this is a lot of work.

In most cases one merely wishes to facilitate aces to the second string. This can be improved without unstringing the instrument. In the case of the 4 string ones, cut groves in both upper and lower bridges to bring the 3rd string very close to the 4th string. 5 mm generally works fine. Then cut another grove exactly midway between the first and 3rd string.

If you are using a 6 stringed instrument you can move 3, 4, and 5 close to the s string. Again a 5mm gap will be sufficient. Move the 2nd string to the midpoint between string 1, and string 3.

In either case we have improved access to the second string without having to do a lot of work.


Thank you David,
This is the direction I chose as well, working with a 6 string Instrument. Glad I was basically on base!
'hege

arvsingh
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Joined: Thu Mar 21, 2013 7:40 pm

Re: Dilruba tuning

Postby arvsingh » Wed Nov 19, 2014 5:21 pm

david wrote:The last post is indeed correct. Look at the bridge and it will tell you whether the other strings were ever intended to be played. In most cases the instrument was designed to only be played with one string. Therefore the other strings are just drone strings.



Hmm, as for history wise, we are never too sure, I do believe however that there were musicians back then that wanted to play the second string at least. I wouldn't doubt that it wasn't played but it wasn't really necessary. I know the third and fourth must had been drones as the way we're suppose to hold this instrument (unless we're totally butchering it lol, which is doubtful). But as being a person who is new to learning an instrument, my curiosity gets the best of me and wants to touch the second string so it can go into a deep melody kind of like a bass but not as heavy.

As for my bridge, it's cause I bought it off of eBay, if I compare the instrument to the one I had bought from Balbir Singh Mouji, you can tell what wasn't made properly on it.

david
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Re: Dilruba tuning

Postby david » Thu Nov 20, 2014 3:54 pm

We have to remember that other than the first string and possibly the second, all of the others are vestigial. In folk sarangs there are no sympathetic strings, and usually only four strings. In such cases the first string was the main one for melody, the second one was usually a drone while 3 and 4 functioned as sympathetic. If you only have four strings then each string will have a significant presence in the sound. Today the presence of sympathetic strings renders all but the first two strings as redundant. Admittedly the bass strings add a slightly different quality to the sound, but it is debatable whether it is really worth the effort. I think that the addition of the extra two strings on a six string dilruba is largely a marketing gimick. It is clear that in the majority of cases the design of the bridge precludes actually playing them.


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