peshkar

Discussions about the Indian percussive instruments.

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pbercker
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Re: peshkar

Post by pbercker » Fri Aug 31, 2012 7:53 pm

hbajpai wrote: The essence of my point was, as simple as a Peshkaar sounds and as effortlessly it appears to be executed, the underlying complexities are significant and should be accounted for. In my own vernacular, if Kaidas are banging on the drums then a Peshkaar is constructing music from the drums. It takes a higher level of maturity, exposure and musical understanding to learn and execute a Peshkaar. A Peshkaar is a personal, individual creative style and should be discussed and presented with critical appreciation in a structured format.

I feel, if one is to particularly discuss Peshkaar's then besides notating a subset of phrases, they also inherit the responsibility to present that discussion with musical criticality and in a structured fashion.
As should have been clear from the cd liner notes, LAK likes to improvise on the phrase Dha Dha Dina, and I myself had mistakenly thought that the long phrase (provided by Bruno Caillat in the liner notes) below the peshkar was another peshkar theme! As is turn out it (again from the liner notes included) it's a phrase that returns to again and again in various forms in his improvisation. The remarkable thing, once you listen to the except included on utube, is indeed its simplicity on paper, and seeming simplicity in execution, and yet the great musical interest it generates. It becomes an exercise in pure rhythm with a minimal use of bols.

Pascal

p.s. perhaps you would do this forum a great deal of good if you yourself presented and discussed a peshkar "with critical appreciation and in a structured format" so that the rest of us can better understand what you are talking about. Perhaps you could even start with the peshkar from Latif Ahmed Kahn which, to my ears, is surpassingly beautiful. And why only perskars to be discussed that why? Why not Kaidas?
My opinion given without any warranties, expressed or implied, that it's even relevant. It would be folly to rely on my opinion without seeking more professional tabla advice. If you are suffering from a tabla condition, seek immediate attention.

pbercker
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Re: peshkar

Post by pbercker » Fri Aug 31, 2012 8:26 pm

hbajpai wrote:Good summary. How about some examples of some peshka?

See the two examples above ... Aloke Dutta's peshkar, but especially Latif Ahmed Khan's peshkar which strikes my as marvously unique!

I am curious ... which peshkar of the two does anyone prefer?

Pascal
My opinion given without any warranties, expressed or implied, that it's even relevant. It would be folly to rely on my opinion without seeking more professional tabla advice. If you are suffering from a tabla condition, seek immediate attention.

dhatitdha
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Re: peshkar

Post by dhatitdha » Tue Sep 13, 2016 1:54 pm

Tabla Notes of peshkar in Teentaal

http://vishwamohini.com/music/music.php?id=80

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VNO Design
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Re: peshkar

Post by VNO Design » Tue Sep 13, 2016 11:10 pm

Just a minor point, but not every Tabla Solo starts with Peshkar as mentioned at the start of this thread. It's popular in other styles to start with Uthan and then Palta Theka to Kaida with no Peshkar portion at all.

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-David
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ankupat
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Re: peshkar

Post by ankupat » Thu Sep 15, 2016 10:47 pm

Those of you who have Dr. Mrinal Pal's book "Step-by-step development of tabla composition from the ground up," will find a complete treatise on Peshkar starting on page 289. After explaining what a Peshkar is, he picks the simplest possible Peshkar, which is an expanded form of the tintal theka at a very slow tempo, and provides expansions and elaborations (vistar). Since this is based on a very slow tempo, each vistar is quite long. There are twenty five of them in the book. This is the finest exposition of Peshkar you will find anywhere. He explains that these same vistar in slightly modified form can be used with any other Peshkar theme. He then develops a large number of Peshkar themes (18 in all) from scratch, some of which are really exotic, not found anywhere else. He then continues with three other Peshkars of an entirely different kind and provides vistar of one of them in three different exciting styles.

These Peshkars are not intended for beginners. They are suitable for intermediate and advanced students. Some of the phrases used in the expansion process, although exquisite, would be quite difficult to play, even for advanced and seasonal performers.

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